20 Best of Letterpress Business Cards

The letterpress business cards featured in this post are a great example of how effective letterpress business cards can reflect you or your company. The stylish and elegant look of letterpress printing combined with the luxurious quality of the paper used will surely make your business card and yourself stand out from the rest.  Letterpress is traditionally used for printing old-school stationery and wedding invitations. However, it is  lately finding its way into other personal printed assets such as business cards, often combining traditional and modern graphic elements.

Letterpress printing is actually a technique in which a plate containing all the graphics and text elements of a design is physically cut. It is then mounted into a big mechanical contraption and then rammed into thick soft stock or paper, leaving not just ink, but depth on the card’s surface.

letterpress business cards

But because somebody has pointed out that my own simplified definition of letterpress is not accurate, here’s a more politically correct way of describing how a letterpress printing works. According to Wiki, letterpress is a term for the relief printing of text and image using a press with a “type-high bed” printing press and movable type, in which a reversed, raised surface is inked and then pressed into a sheet of paper to obtain a positive right-reading image.

Letterpress was the normal form of printing text in the West since mid-15th century until the 19th century. It remained in wide use for books and other uses until the second half of the 20th century.

In the 21st century, commercial letterpress has been revived by the use of ‘water-wash’ photopolymer plates. If done right, it can look absolutely gorgeous. However, the hipness and respect that you can get from owning a letterpress business card also come with a price. So if you are frequently handing out a lot of cards, then you would be thinking twice before getting a letterpress business card.


20 GORGEOUS EXAMPLES OF LETTERPRESS BUSINESS CARDS

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Author: Gisela

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9 Comments

  1. Thanks for posting our some of our press work. Could you please contact us right away regarding this post, we need to request an edit. Thanks.

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  2. Ah, Letterpress… can’t seem to get enough of it. I love it. The cards the beautiful and some have exploited the Letterpress effect very judiciously. I’m eyeing Caroline Myers’ card with much envy. Thanks for the lovely collection.

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  3. Lovely examples!

    I will confess, though, that I’ve never understood why someone would print business cards and include a yahoo.com or gmail.com email address. Especially if they have a website, or should have one.

    Sorry…it’s just a pet peeve.

    Post a Reply
    • @Jacqui
      Well, Maybe convenience and accessibility are the main reasons why people prefer to receive emails via yahoo or gmail. It’s also a permanent thing. Like for example, if you’re working for a company, you are not likely to take the email address you have with that company once you leave. Same with your email address that’s attached to your dot-com website. What if you decide to give up your domain or sell it? Thanks for the comments, anyway. It’s very much appreciated.

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  4. Please please please fix your description of letterpress printing. The design is not “cut out”, nor should you describe such an elegant machine as a “metal contraption” or printing as “ramming” paper into the plate.

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    • I already revised my description. I hope that makes you feel better. Thanks for pointing it out. I am not an expert in letterpress printing.

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  5. Nice work indeed!
    Thanks!

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  6. Great examples. The question I always have after reading these business card posts is… where in the world can you get stuff like this done? If the examples had more details next to them such as the vendor and approximate cost, that would be great. I looked at slowprint but also want more options. thx

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